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MOBILISING SCIENCE, COMMUNITY AND POLICY FOR PREVENTION

Boehringer-Ingelheim International



Abstracts

Mobilising Science, Community and Policy for Prevention


Abstract submissions have closed on the 31st of May 2016, please contact the Conference Secretariat for more information.

Despite South Africa’s remarkable political and social transformation and development gains since 1994, the country continues to experience staggering levels of deaths, injuries and disabilities arising from violence. The extent, gratuitous nature and consequences of violence, as well as the vision of a violence-free society, enshrined in instruments such as the National Development Plan, require a cross-sectoral and trans-disciplinary platform to lead, shape, and critically inform social and intellectual responses for the reduction and prevention of violence.

The First South African National Conference on Violence: Mobilising Science, Community and Policy for Prevention will bring together researchers, interventionists, community agencies, and policy makers to focus on the science, community partnerships and policy formulations required for significant violence reduction and peace promotion in South Africa.

For Abstract submision guidelines, please click here

TRACKS

  • Child Abuse and Neglect  
  • Elder Abuse and Violence 
  • Epidemiology, Data and Information Systems  
  • Gender Violence 
  • Public and Collective Violence
  • School and Youth Violence
  • Science-Community and Policy Partnership
  • Suicide and Self Directed Violence
  • Trauma and Trauma Care                                     
  • Child Abuse and Neglect
    Child maltreatment is a global problem with serious life-long consequences. A quarter of all adults report having been physically abused as children and 1 in 5 women and 1 in 13 men report having been sexually abused as a child. Child maltreatment is the abuse and neglect that occurs to children under 18 years of age. It includes all types of physical and/or emotional ill-treatment, sexual abuse, neglect, negligence and commercial or other exploitation, which results in actual or potential harm to the child’s health, survival, development or dignity in the context of a relationship of responsibility, trust or power. The Track will include presentations on research and innovation, prevention and intervention, and policy and practice.

  • School and Youth Violence
    Youth violence is a global public health problem. It includes a range of acts from bullying and physical fighting, to more severe sexual and physical assault to homicide. Gang violence, endemic in parts of South Africa, will also be included here. Youth homicide and non-fatal violence not only contribute greatly to the burden of premature death, injury and disability, but also have a serious, often lifelong, impact on a survivor’s psychological and social functioning. This can affect survivors’ families, friends and communities. Youth violence increases the costs of health, welfare and criminal justice services; reduces productivity; and decreases the value of property. This Track will include victim and perpetrator descriptions, early violence prevention interventions, in and out of school youth situations, innovative approaches to youth violence prevention, and the role of data and evidence in prevention.

  • Gender Violence
    Gender-based violence results from the power inequalities that are based on gender roles and undermines the health, dignity, security and autonomy of its survivors, yet in many communities it remains shrouded in a culture of silence. Survivors of violence can suffer sexual and reproductive health consequences, including forced and unwanted pregnancies, unsafe abortions, sexually transmitted infections including HIV, and even death. The United Nations defines violence against women as "any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or mental harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life."  Around the world, gender-based violence almost always has a greater negative impact on women and girls. For this reason the term "Gender-based Violence" is often used interchangeably with the term "Violence against Women”. This Track will include presentations on the epidemiology, prevention, and collaborative community and other innovative responses.

  • Elder Abuse and Violence
    Elder abuse is an important public health problem. While there is little information regarding the extent of abuse in elderly populations, it is estimated that 1 in 10 older people experience abuse each month, likely an underestimate. Elder abuse is a single or repeated act, or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust, and which causes harm or distress to an older person. This Track will include presentations on epidemiology and collaborative and innovative social and community responses.

  • Public and Collective Violence
    Collective violence refers to violence committed by larger groups of individuals and can encompasses events such as war and genocide. It applies when one group makes instrumental use of violence against another to achieve an objective. It is associated with major threats to health in what tends to be the world's poorer countries. In 2000, an estimated 310000 deaths resulted directly from collective violence -- mostly in Africa and South-East Asia.  Indirect effects of collective violence are infectious disease, malnutrition, population displacement, psychosocial sequelae, and exacerbation of chronic disease. In South Africa, there has been the escalation of public violence, which has been used to specifically describe organised or organically evolving community protests around a range of issues, including housing, education and recently university education, and employment rights. Such protests may start out peacefully and be socially sanctioned, and serve as either a mechanism for resolving disputes, or to bring about change.  This Track will include presentations on case reflections, epidemiological descriptions, and innovative community, national and international responses.

  • Suicide and Self Directed Violence
    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Among those aged 15-44 years, self-inflicted injuries are the fourth leading cause of death and the sixth leading cause of ill-health and disability. In much of the world, suicide is stigmatized and condemned for religious or cultural reasons. In some countries, suicidal behaviour is a criminal offence punishable by law. Suicide is therefore often a secretive act surrounded by taboo, and may be unrecognized, misclassified or deliberately hidden in official records of death. The Global Burden of Disease project estimates that 797 823 suicides occurred in 2011, over half of all the deaths due to violence. The Track will involve reports on suicidal behaviour, attempted suicides, self-mutilation and euthanasia.

  • Epidemiology, Data and Information Systems
    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events (including disease), and the application of studies to the control of diseases and other health problems. Various methods can be used to carry out epidemiological investigations: surveillance and descriptive studies can be used to study event distribution; analytical studies are used to study determinants. The goal of Data and Information Systems in health is to improve country, regional and health information. The Information Systems is a gateway to data and statistics, analysis and reports on key themes, standards, tools and methods for data collection, compilations, analysis and dissemination and country measurement and evaluation. Epidemiological approaches to multiple violence and violence related determinants, and prevention interventions will be included in this Track.

  • Science-Community and Policy Partnership  
    Policy-makers and community decision makers need reliable up-to-date evidence about “what works” in violence prevention. While most countries have in place laws and regulations that address at least some of the issues associated with violence, and in some there are strategies to tackle the consequences of violence, many countries and communities have a low awareness about the magnitude of the problem. The formation of partnerships between the science, community and policy sectors is crucial to support effective, coordinated responses to violence prevention in South Africa. Reflections and scientific presentations on successful partnerships will be included here.

  • Trauma and Trauma Care
    Survivors of trauma receive care and attention from many individuals within a wide range of specialities and professional backgrounds. Trauma Care aims to improve the outcome of the trauma survivor by establishing best practice throughout the whole chain of care. Trauma care aims to promote and define best practice in the management of trauma. Topics include: emergency care in austere and different environments, disaster and humanitarian aid, advanced practice, emergency care across the age spectrum, quality and safety in emergency care, research and education, patient safety and non-technical skills, and innovation and improvement.